Monthly Archive: September 2015

TRAVEL IS A PRIVILEGE

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Let us face it: not everybody can travel. Whether it is position, family obligations, or cash, traveling is out of reach for a big percent of the people in the world.

In the “leave your job to travel the world” cheerleading that occurs so frequently on travel websites (including this one), we frequently forget that it is not simple for everyone.

Years on the road have shown me that for a lot of us, our inability to travel is part a mindset problem (since we consider traveling is

expensive, we do not look for means to make it more affordable) and component a spending problem (we spend money on things we do not want).

There are those for whom no mindset change, have parents or kids to take care of spending cuts, or budget help will help those that are too ill traveling –, confront great debt, or work three jobs simply to make rent. After all, 2.8 billion people — almost 40% of the the — of world’s survive on less than $2 USD a day! Inside my home country of America, 14% of the populace is below the poverty line, 46 million people are on food stamps, many have to work two jobs to get by, and we’ve got a trillion dollars in student debt dragging down people.

Nothing any web site can say will make travel a reality for all those individuals.

Those people who really do travel are a few that are privileged.

privilege

Whether we leave our jobs spend two months in Europe to travel the world, or take our children on a quick holiday to Disney World, we get to experience something most individuals of the world WOn’t ever get an opportunity to do.

We overlook that much. I Have thought a lot about privilege — a foundation take deprived pupils on educational excursions abroad — as I Have began assembling FLYTE.

I was raised with parents who paid my college tuition in a predominately white, middle class town. I had a job after school that enabled me take holidays to live on my own, and save for my first trip all over the world. Where I could save to expand my journeys, and, since I talk English, I readily found work teaching English in Thailand.

Hard work does not exist in a bubble, although that is not to say that hard work does not count — the circumstances that create the chances for work that is hard to bear fruit are frequently more significant.

I have met with folks of all ages, incomes, abilities, and nationalities on the road. People like Don and Alison, that are backpacking the world at 70; Michael, who worked 60-hour weeks at a minimum wage occupation; Cory, who travels the world in a wheelchair; Ishwinder, who did not let visa limitations prevent him; and innumerable others.

But they’d alternative abilities, occupations that allowed for overtime, or conditions that enabled them to travel — support from relatives and buddies. They were not just getting by or on social assistance. They did not wonder if they could manage their next meal.

So it is vital that you keep in mind that we’re a number of the fortunate ones. We get to do something that others WOn’t ever have the ability to do.

We’re privileged.

Even if you have hitchhiked across the world free of cash, worked abroad, cut prices to travel all over the world on $10 USD a day, or traveling-hacked your solution to a first class ticket, you’ve got the chance to do something most folks go to sleep just dreaming about. You’ve got choice and the liberty to move about the planet in a way most folks do not.